Happy 2019!

To All Our Readers…

Wishing you a New Year full of research and discovery.  May you add many more “leaves” to your Family Tree.

Can it be possible that we are embarking on the sixth year of our publication?  We hope you have enjoyed the variety of information we have provided for you. Feel free to contact us with any suggestions or articles.

As always, visit our website regularly at:  www.wmarootsevents.com

–From The Staff at Western Massachusetts Roots Events

 

News from the National Archives Catalog

What’s in a name? Help make naturalization records name searchable

What’s in a name? Quite a lot, it turns out, if you are searching for a petition for naturalization and do not know the court of naturalization or petition number. And if you’re in the midst of family or historical research, you’re probably already looking for these records (or you soon will be!). Even though petitions for naturalization filed prior to October 1906 typically contain less information than those filed after that date, these records can be an invaluable resource and remain some of our most requested records at the National Archives at New York City.

This series of Petitions for Naturalization, newly added to the Catalog, contains copies of naturalization records for individuals who filed in Federal, state and local courts in New York from 1790 through 1906. As a general rule, the National Archives does not hold naturalization records created in State or local courts. However, because this series of records is comprised of copies of the originals, our New York office maintains petitions for naturalization filed through Federal, state, and local courts in New York City for the years 1794-1906.

Still not convinced you need to track down these records? Well, that’s where the Catalog comes in! This significant part of our naturalization collection was recently added to the Catalog. The entire series of petitions for naturalization filed through Federal, state, and local courts in New York City prior to October 1906 (over 598 records!) are available in the Catalog in their entirely–the whole record! The records contain the petitioner’s name, age, place of birth, occupation, date and place of emigration, as well as date and place of arrival in the United States.

These records are not yet searchable by name in our Catalog, but that’s where you come in! Help us make these records more searchable by tagging the records with the petitioner’s name, or go a step further and transcribe the entire record.

On the petition for naturalization. Look for the names of the petitioners within the record and type the names you see in the Tag field. This now makes the record searchable by name!

Look for names of petitioners within the naturalization records.Tag the names so they’re searchable. No need to transcribe the entire page (but we won’t stop you!).

15th New England Regional Genealogical Conference 3-6 April 2019 Manchester, NH

The New England Regional Genealogical Consortium, Inc. (NERGC) invites you to join us at our fifteenth conference 3-6 April 2019 at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Manchester, New Hampshire. Continue to follow our E-zines to keep up-to-date on the planning and the excitement of this conference.

REGISTRATION FOR NERGC 2019 IS NOW OPEN!

Registration is now open! Printed conference brochures are available around New England thanks to distribution by our participating societies. A pdf of the brochure is available at http://www.nergc.org/wp-conte…/uploads/2018/…/NERGC-2019.pdf.

After exploring the brochure, register online at http://bit.ly/REG_NERGC_2019 and then “Register Now”.

The fifth 2019 New England Regional Genealogical Conference E-zine is now available at http://www.nergc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/NERGC-2019-E-zine-5.pdf.  It includes Conference registration information, important hotel updates, and much more.