Free Webinar from American Ancestors

Introducing the GU272 

Live Broadcast: Thursday, May 23, 3:00–4:00 PM EDT
Presented by Meaghan E. H. Siekman, Genealogist of the Newbury Street Press
Cost: FREE
In 1838, Georgetown University sold 272 enslaved men, women, and children to plantations in Louisiana. Thousands of their descendants are alive today. American Ancestors has partnered with the GU272 Memory Project which seeks to document the stories, family history, and legacy of these individuals and their descendants. Join American Ancestors expert, Meaghan Siekman, to learn about GU272 genealogical research and our new website that features a searchable database, oral histories of the descendants, and research tools for GU272 descendants and their families.
Click HERE to register

Free NEHGS Webinar – 18 April 19

Researching Women in Archives

Live Broadcast: Thursday, 4/18, 3:00–4:00 PM EDT
Presented by NEHGS Archivist Judy Lucey
Cost: FREE
Women make up 50% of your ancestry, yet their lives, experiences, and even complete names are all too often forgotten by written history. Although often overlooked in official records, throughout time women have been the keepers of family and personal history. When items such as diaries, letters, account books, family Bibles, samplers, and organization records survive, they can reveal more about a woman’s daily life than any government record. Archivist Judy Lucey will discuss how these unique records and manuscripts can be used to piece together a family story and how digging in the archives can lead to hitting genealogical gold.

Free Webinar from NEHGS/American Ancestors – 21 March 2019

Using and Evaluating Published Genealogies

Thursday, March 21, 3:00–4:00 PM EDT
Presented by Alicia Crane Williams, FASG
FREE and open to the public

 

Following the advent of American genealogy in the early to mid-19th century, thousands of genealogies were published featuring families across the country. While largely uncited—and arguably biased—these early works continue to be an important resource for modern day family historians. Join Lead Genealogist of the Early New England Families Study Project and frequent contributor to the Vita Brevis blog, Alicia Crane Williams, to learn how you can access, evaluate, and utilize early published family histories in your research.

Click HERE to Register.